Page last updated at 10:45 GMT, Wednesday, 19 August 2009 11:45 UK

Strike 'will not delay A-levels'

results
A-levels results are due out on Thursday

Students awaiting A-level results are being assured they will not be affected by industrial action by postal workers.

The Royal Mail said it had "robust contingency plans" to ensure results would be delivered to schools on time.

The Joint Council for Qualifications added that schools would have access to students' results through exam boards' secure internet sites.

Postal workers have been staging a series of regional strikes for the past few weeks over jobs, pay and services.

Areas likely to be affected by the action by members of the Communication Workers Union (CWU) include Coventry, Leamington Spa, Nottingham, Stoke-on-Trent, London, Birmingham, Essex, Peterborough, Bristol, Leeds, Boston and Carrickfergus.

A Royal Mail spokesman said: "Royal Mail has robust contingency plans to ensure delivery of A-level results to schools on Thursday to counter any CWU strike action, as we fully understand the huge importance of getting the results to students on time."

Dr Jim Sinclair, director of the Joint Council for Qualifications, said: "Royal Mail has confirmed to awarding bodies that robust arrangements are in place to safeguard the delivery of results to centres.

"Centres also receive their results files via electronic data interchange (EDI) and will have access to results via awarding bodies' secure extranets."

A-levels results are due out on Thursday and GCSE results are due the following week.

Scottish students received their Higher and Standard Grade results earlier this month. Overall attainment showed a small improvement.



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