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Last Updated: Tuesday, 3 July 2007, 10:23 GMT 11:23 UK
University serves tennis degree
Tim Henman
The degree course will teach the science of tennis
A degree course in tennis is being launched by the University of Central Lancashire.

With the Wimbledon championship failing to serve up any British successes, the new degree course is aimed at raising the nation's game at tennis.

The university claims that the sports technology degree in tennis is the first of its kind in this country.

It will tackle the physical, psychological and nutritional demands of the game.

Students taking the BSc course will be prepared for entering the "tennis industry" - and it hopes to increase the number of top-ranked coaches in this country.

'Motion analysis'

At present, the Preston-based university says, there are not enough British coaches among the staff supporting the world's best players.

The degree course will address the "knowledge gap" for tennis players and coaches surrounding the "scientific and technological" aspects of tennis, says the university.

This will involve techniques such as three-dimentional "motion analysis" of tennis movements, using images from 10 cameras.

"There are a number of career opportunities which students can go on to pursue on completion of the course because of its science base," says Dr David Fewtrell, senior lecturer in sports technology.

"Some of these paths may be equipment design and manufacturing sector, research and development of sports products and technical sales and product support."


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