BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Education  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 27 November, 2002, 11:52 GMT
Four year olds excluded from school
1,400 primary pupils were given their marching orders
Children as young as four are being permanently excluded from school - as government statistics show an overall increase in exclusions.

The annual statistics, for the academic year 2000-2001, show an increase of 10% in permanent exclusions from state schools in England.

And the proportion of primary school exclusions within the total is at its highest level since the Labour government came into office.

School exclusions 2000-2001
10% increase
83% excluded pupils are boys
Black pupils three times more likely to be excluded than white
13 four year olds excluded
14 year olds most likely to be excluded
London has highest exclusion rate
Two-thirds of excluded primary pupils did not get full-time education

The increase follows two years of substantial decreases, following a peak in 1997-1998 - as the government pursued a policy of reducing exclusions.

These targets for exclusions have now been scrapped - and it is expected that next year's figures will show an even bigger upwards surge.

The total of over 9,000 exclusions includes 13 four year olds and 52 five year olds, almost all boys, who have been removed from their schools.

Once excluded from school, the statistics for last year suggest that many pupils failed to get a full education - a problem that the government is seeking to tackle.

Less than a third of excluded primary school pupils received a full-time education.

A tenth of excluded pupils dropped out of the education system, and almost half of excluded children up to the age of 14 received less than 12 hours education per week.

The national breakdown of exclusions shows that boys remain much more likely to be excluded than girls, representing 83% of all exclusions.

This proportion has remain almost unchanged since the mid-1990s.

Black pupils are still much more likely to be excluded than their white counterparts, although this year's figure of being three times more likely is a decrease from four times the previous year.

This imbalance between levels of black and white exclusions has steadily reduced in the past five years.

Referral units

And 80% of exclusions are in secondary school, with 14 year olds the age group with the greatest number of exclusions.

But 16% of exclusions were in primary schools, a figure that has steadily risen from 12% in 1996-1997.

Although the rate of exclusions as a percentage of the primary school population has remained unchanged for the past four years, staying at 0.03%.

The highest rates of exclusions were in London and the north-west, with the lowest in the east of England.

The largest number of pupils excluded are sent to pupil referral units. These have been opened across the country, with 67 opened during 2002.

The next largest number are taught at home or sign up for courses at further education colleges.

See also:

23 May 02 | Education
18 Nov 02 | England
23 May 02 | Education
24 May 02 | Education
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Education stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Education stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes