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EDITIONS
Thursday, 3 October, 2002, 14:28 GMT 15:28 UK
Net beats books with children
school ICT room
Massively more has been spent on PCs than on books
Children apparently know more about the internet than about books, a survey suggests.

Six out of 10 youngsters questioned knew that "homepage" was the front page of a website - but only 9% could explain what the preface to a book was.

More than a third knew that "hardback" was a type of book, but 57% identified "hard drive" as part of a computer.

Children said they were regularly using the internet to help with their school work.

Homework help

Almost three-quarters had used the net to find information for a project, and just over half said that what they had learned online had directly improved their grades.

The results are from a survey of 1,000 seven to 16 year olds questioned by NOP Research across the UK for MSN.co.uk.

The initials "www" meant world wide web to 70%, but less than a quarter of the sample knew that RSVP was asking them to reply to an invitation.

Sixty-nine per cent said the web made homework easier, 67% quicker and 66% more fun because of the combination of sounds and pictures.

Clued up

There was also confirmation of the anecdotal evidence that pupils are often more web wise than the people teaching them.

Almost two thirds of the children had helped an adult to use the net - with a fifth helping their teachers.

MSN marketing manager Stuart Anderson said: "Kids have embraced the internet because it plays to their natural strengths - it's dynamic, fast, ever-changing and interactive.

"The results of our research clearly show that children's knowledge and ability to learn is not reducing, but adapting and growing to keep up with the developing technology.

"Kids have always moved with the times - and it's great now to see them helping adults to as well."

See also:

01 Oct 02 | Technology
03 Dec 01 | England
17 Aug 00 | Education
06 Sep 02 | Technology
06 Feb 01 | Education
21 May 01 | Education
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