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Monday, October 12, 1998 Published at 17:05 GMT 18:05 UK


Education

Snap, crackle and cash

Lifelong learning at Oxford is to expand (photo: Kellogg College)

Kellogg College, an Oxford college which specialises in part-time courses, is to receive a £6m private donation to fund its plans for expansion.

The grant from the WK Kellogg Foundation will allow the college to find larger premises and meet the growing demand for part-time degrees and adult education.


[ image: The WK Kellogg Foundation was set up by the founder of the cereal company]
The WK Kellogg Foundation was set up by the founder of the cereal company
Established in 1990 and re-named Kellogg College in 1994 after previous donations, the college is dedicated to "lifelong learning" - in which people continue studying and training after finishing formal education.

At present, Kellogg College has 150 students taking part-time undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses and 16,000 students taking adult education courses with the university's Department for Continuing Education.

The £6m donation is the latest gift from the educational trust created in 1930 by Will Keith Kellogg, the founder of the breakfast cereal company, to promote lifelong learning. Last week the government announced £9m for adult education across the whole of England.

Headteacher studying for D Phil

Among the students who will benefit from the injection of cash is Neil Hawkes, headteacher at West Kidlington Primary School and Orchard Meadow First School in Oxford, who is beginning his fourth year of a D Phil in educational studies.

"When I saw Oxford University was offering a part-time D Phil I was very keen to continue my studies. Lifelong learning has always been part of my philosophy and now at the age of 51 I am able to continue my studies and bring my experience to bear in an academic context," he said.

This more flexible approach to learning will be taken a stage further next year with the introduction of online degree courses in history, immunology and computer studies.



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Kellogg College Oxford

WK Kellogg Foundation

Oxford Department for Continuing Education

DfEE advice on lifelong learning


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