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EDITIONS
Tuesday, 9 April, 2002, 15:15 GMT 16:15 UK
Pupils share historic funeral
pupils watching the funeral on television
Pupils watched the funeral coverage in their classrooms
Schools have been encouraged to let pupils watch television coverage of the Queen Mother's funeral service on television.

BBC News Online's Katherine Sellgren visited Ilford Jewish Primary School in Essex to see what children made of the Queen Mother's life and her death.

Not all head teachers were able to comply with government guidance to screen coverage of the Queen Mother's funeral - a lack of television sets and space made this impractical for many schools.

Michaele
Michaele: "We took an interest in her"
But pupils at Ilford Jewish Primary School are lucky enough to have a television in every classroom and so each class watched at least part of the funeral coverage.

Deputy head teacher Roz Levin said staff felt it was important to mark the occasion.

"This sort of occasion doesn't happen terribly often at all - it's a once in a lifetime thing.

"As the children came into school this morning they were asking if they were going to be watching any of it on television.

"There's been a lot of coverage, so they couldn't have helped but know what was going on."

Important viewing

"I wanted to watch the funeral - I would have been very disappointed if we hadn't been allowed to watch it," said 11-year-old Kourtney.

Kourtney
Kourtney: "She brought up such a nice queen"
"She was so nice to us and everything, she brought up such a nice queen and so many good things you can't really describe."

"Whether she's dead or alive, she's still our Queen Mother," said Roseanne, aged 10.

"It's not like we knew her or anything, but we took an interest in her," said Michaele, aged 11.

The lying-in-state

Eleven-year-old Jessica was especially keen to watch the funeral, having queued for seven hours on Sunday to see the Queen Mother lying in state in Westminster Hall.

Jessica
Jessica saw the lying-in-state
"It was worth going - it was amazing, I felt all funny inside," said Jessica.

"I went to pay my respects - no-one likes losing someone, it's the worst thing in the world."

Jessica said she felt she had taken part in history by following events since the Queen's Mother's death on Easter Saturday.

"It's history for everyone - when I'm older and have children I can tell them about it.

"And when another royal person dies, I'll take my children."

Death
Simon
Simon: "It makes you think about death"

Simon, aged 11, agreed that by watching the funeral, he was taking part in history.

But it also made him aware of human mortality.

"It's sad she's dead, but she's lucky to have lived to 101, because not many people do," said Simon.

"It's hard because it makes you think about death. It's very emotional and it makes you feel sad."


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09 Apr 02 | UK
09 Apr 02 | UK Education
05 Apr 02 | UK Education
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