BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Education  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 12 February, 2002, 13:33 GMT
Teenagers offered flexible curriculum
exam hall
Pupils will be offered a tailor-made education
Teenagers are to be given greater flexibility in their education, as the government outlines plans to encourage the majority of youngsters to stay on in school or college beyond 16.

The Education Secretary, Estelle Morris, said the proposals were a "radical agenda that challenged long-held educational traditions".

BBC News Online outlines the core changes laid out in the Green Paper.

  • Encourage almost all young people to stay in education and training until they are 19 years old.

  • Develop a flexible combination of academic and vocational options so that young people can find courses that are relevant to their aptitudes.

  • At 14, pupils will be able to drop academic subjects such as geography and modern foreign languages and will be able to take up vocational options such as tourism and manufacturing.

    However, all pupils will have to study maths, English, science and information and communication technology.

  • The most able pupils will be allowed to bypass GCSE exams and move straight on to AS-levels.

  • A new "Distinction" grade will be introduced as the highest award at A-level (both vocational and academic) to challenge and acknowledge the highest achievers.

  • A Matriculation Diploma will be introduced at age 19, which will be an "overarching" award which can include vocational and academic subjects.

  • The government wants a "parity of status" between vocational and academic courses.

While not part of the Green Paper on post-14 education reform, the government has also announced plans to make the learning of foreign languages compulsory in primary schools.

It has set a target for an entitlement to language lessons for every child from the age of seven upwards by 2010.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Education Secretary, Estelle Morris MP
"We want schools to provide flexibility"

Main proposals

Other changes

Analysis: Mike Baker
See also:

12 Feb 02 | Education
12 Feb 02 | Education
11 Feb 02 | Education
11 Feb 02 | Education
Links to more Education stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Education stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes