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Thursday, 23 August, 2001, 10:08 GMT 11:08 UK
Learning after GCSEs 'a lottery'
results
How many will stay on in education?
Pupils receiving their GSCE results this week could be the victims of a postcode lottery in terms of furthering their education, experts warned.

The number of young people in England who stay on in education after completing their GCSEs varied massively according to where they lived, the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) warned.


Don't let your school days be the end of your learning career

John Harwood

While many areas were very effective in encouraging teenagers to stay on in education beyond GCSEs, youngsters in some areas were giving up "too soon", the LSC said.

Four local LSCs - Essex, Cambridgeshire, the Black Country and London East - have fewer than 70% of 17 year olds in education, compared with 80% or more staying on in other areas.

John Harwood, Chief Executive of the LSC, said: "Across England, we see differing pockets of success in encouraging young people to stay on in learning".

"More than 80% of 17 year olds stay in education and training in Cumbria, North Yorkshire, Hertfordshire and Cheshire/Warrington, which we applaud.

"However, we now need to build on these local accomplishments and find out what really motivates young people to keep on learning. That way we can bring about the radical change we need to raise significantly the skills of the nation."

Stay on!

Mr Harwood urged teenagers to stay on in education, saying it would improve their long-tern job prospects.

The message for young people today could not be clearer, he said.

"Don't let your school days be the end of your learning career. It will effect your earning potential, your long-term job prospects and the financial health of the nation," Mr Harwood warned.

"While we have seen a steady growth in the number of young people staying on in education after their GCSEs, we want more young people to realise the benefits of learning for life and achieve their full potential.

"Our goal is to increase the proportion of 16 to 18 year olds in education, learning and training from 75.8% to 80% by 2004," he said.

Exam results in the UK

GCSEs/GNVQs

A/AS-levels

Success stories

Features

Row over new exams

WATCH/LISTEN

TALKING POINT
See also:

23 Aug 01 | UK Education
21 Aug 01 | UK Education
21 Aug 01 | N Ireland
17 May 01 | UK Education
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