BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: UK: Education  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
England
N Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Politics
Education
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 17 May, 2001, 18:16 GMT 19:16 UK
Academics call for red tape cut
AUT conference hall
Lecturers say inspections are too heavy handed
By Angela Harrison at the AUT conference

Academics have condemned the amount of red tape in higher education, saying millions of pounds of tax-payers' money is being wasted.

During their annual conference at Scarborough in North Yorkshire, members of the Association of University Teachers, have complained about the heavy burden of bureaucracy.

David Triesman
David Triesman attacked the "nightmare on academic street"
General secretary, David Triesman, said lecturers and academics had a duty to speak out about waste.

He said: "We will no longer endure this absurd nightmare on academic street. It is time for the academic profession to rise up and challenge the red tape and waste that is holding our universities back."

The conference passed a motion condemning bureaucracy involved in monitoring the quality of university teaching and research.

The monitoring is carried out by the Quality Assurance Agency and the Research Assessment Exercise.

Mr Triesman told the conference: "After thousands upon thousands of inspections and hundreds of thousands of forms, and 300m spent directly on teaching quality inspection each year, there are are hardly more than half a dozen courses found wanting."

The union would like the present systems to be replaced by one in which universities would carry out their own audit of performance in areas such as the quality of teaching and courses.

But the AUT says it recognises there is also a role for external examiners.

President-elect of the AUT, Natalie Fenton, said: "All university staff accept there has to be some monitoring, but this system is too heavy-handed."

See also:

17 May 01 | UK Education
26 Jan 01 | UK Education
16 May 01 | UK Education
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Education stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Education stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes