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Friday, 15 September, 2000, 16:17 GMT 17:17 UK
The fuel blockade

The nationwide fuel blockades which have been paralysing the UK are over, but many petrol stations are still dry. Fuel deliveries are being made, but priority is being given to essential services. We round up the best of the BBC's coverage of the protests and their aftermath.


The effects

Nationwide fuel protests end, but motorists may have to wait two weeks for petrol.

The UK Prime Minister Tony Blair condemns the blockades and says such tactics will not be accepted by the government.

Brynle Williams, the protest leader at Stanlow, explains why he has decided that protesters will now leave.

The crisis has led to people panic-buying at supermarkets, leading to fears of a food shortage as the BBC's Margaret Gilmore reports.

Justin Webb looks at the long-term effect of the strikes in other countries around Europe.

The BBC's Fergus Walsh reports on the effect on emergency services.

The BBC's Richard Wells joined a tanker driver as he pulled out of the Stanlow refinery in Cheshire, the first to end the blockade.

The Director-General of the CBI, Digby Jones, condemned the protests saying: "We are not France"

The BBC's Simon Montague reports on the state of public transport which is still in a state of flux because of the petrol.

Liam Olliff, of transport group Transfigoroute UK, says he is unable to deliver to some clients.

The BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones reports on the rise in the price of petrol.


Reaction and analysis

A week into the crisis, the UK Prime Minister Tony Blair called a news conference in Downing Street, where he said he would listen to protesters, but would not be intimidated. He did not rule out reconvening Parliament.

And the UK Chancellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown, said no decision would be made because of blockades.

The BBC's political correspondent, John Pienaar on the political fallout of the fuel crisis.

The BBC's Gavin Hewitt spent the day at the Purfleet oil depot in Essex, to see why they eventually decided to give up:

TUC General Secretary, John Monks: "We are totally unsympathetic to the means that are being used"

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