BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK
Front Page 
World 
UK 
England 
Northern Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Thursday, 10 August, 2000, 19:27 GMT 20:27 UK
'Cybersquatting' enters Oxford dictionary

Cybersquatting, frankenfood and white-van man are the latest words to be included in the Oxford dictionary.

Combat trousers and WAP phones are two more of 67 new words to have been included in the Oxford Compact English Dictionary.

Other words on the list to join the 145,000 current listing include superwaif, fashion icon and bindhi (a face jewel).

White van
'White-van man' is now a part of the English language
The publishers monitor television, radio, newspapers and magazines to establish which words have become part of the English language and are used in every day conversations.

Fashionists (people who look forward to fashion shows) will be included in the new edition, as will shrug (close fitting woman's cardigan), carpenter trousers (multi-pocketed trousers with loops for tools) and buzz-cut (today's answer to the crew-cut).

Editor of the new dictionary Catherine Soanes said fashion and beauty had always been major contributors to the English language.

"Many hundreds of words for types of garment are already in the complete record of the English language, the Oxford English Dictionary, and the trend is continuing."

'Sticky' and 'screenager'

The information and technology world also has a number of new entries, including meatspace (physical world, as opposed to virtual), screenager (Internet or computer addicted teenager) and sticky (website attracting long or repeated visits from users).

More unusual words that have warranted a place include gaydar (ability of one gay person to recognise another) and lookism (discrimination on the grounds of how a person looks and the clothes they wear).

But the word Blairism - derived from the Prime Minister Tony Blair - has not been included.

The dictionary's editors said the word must pass the test of time and cannot just be a passing fashion.

Not all words have stood that test and the fashion world seems particularly badly affected.

There are no longer inclusions for directoires (long knickers) and hug-me-tight (1860s woman's close-fitting jacket).

The Oxford University Press dictionary will be published on 14 August.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories