Page last updated at 14:03 GMT, Tuesday, 8 June 2010 15:03 UK

Number of elderly to rise two-thirds by 2031

Elderly man in wheelchair
The wealth of older people also varies from region to region

The number of people aged 65 and over is expected to rise by nearly two-thirds to reach 15.8 million by 2031, according to newly released figures.

More than one in five of the UK's population will be 65 or over by 2031.

Northern Ireland, the East Midlands and eastern England are expected to have the highest increases in this group. London is predicted to have the lowest.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) said the highest percentages are in south-west England and Wales.

In the south-west of England, 39% of its population is over 50 and in Wales 37% of its population.

London and Northern Ireland had the lowest percentages of people aged 50 and over at 26% and 31% respectively.

A net figure of almost 25,000 people aged 50 years and over left London between mid-2007 and mid-2008.

The figures also showed that how well-off the over-50s are varies from region to region.

Employment rates for those aged between 50 and the state pension age were at the highest in south-east England and lowest in Northern Ireland.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Tories outline 'pensioner pledge'
26 Mar 10 |  UK Politics
Concerns over elderly population
19 Apr 10 |  England
Overweight elderly 'live longer'
29 Jan 10 |  Health

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2020 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific