Page last updated at 15:17 GMT, Thursday, 3 June 2010 16:17 UK

BA apologises for Bin Laden 'boarding pass' gaffe

Osama Bin Laden
Osama Bin Laden is the world's most wanted terrorist

British Airways has apologised after a photograph in a staff magazine showed a frequent flyer boarding pass in the name of Osama Bin Laden.

The image appeared on the front page of LHR News and was meant to promote the benefits of online check-in.

It showed a passenger holding up an iPhone displaying a boarding pass in the name Bin Laden/Osama, seat 07-C.

A BA spokesman apologised and said: "A mistake was made and we are working to find out how this occurred."

LHR News is a magazine for BA employees at London's Heathrow airport.

The latest front page shows a happy passenger arriving at check-in while another holds up his iPhone showing a virtual boarding pass bearing Osama Bin Laden's name.

It classes the world's most wanted terrorist and leader of al-Qaeda as a "frequent flyer", and his seat number places him at the front of the plane.

The pass has him flying on 26 October 2010 to an unspecified destination.

BA apologised for the error on its Twitter feed after being alerted to the image by other users of the social networking site.

The airline is currently embroiled in a long-running dispute with cabin crew over pay, conditions and staff travel perks.

The latest in a series of five-day walkouts is due to end on Thursday, with another set to begin on Saturday unless a deal can be reached between BA and unions.



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