BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK
Front Page 
World 
UK 
England 
Northern Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 



Diana Lamplugh
"Victims will come forward much quicker"
 real 56k

The BBC's Judith Moloney
"The booklet offers advice to both police and victims"
 real 56k

Tracy Morgan Survivors of Stalkers
"Thankyou for taking us seriously"
 real 56k

Tuesday, 1 August, 2000, 14:47 GMT 15:47 UK
Stalkers' register proposed
Stalking
Police launch guide to crackdown on stalking
Convicted stalkers could be made to sign a register of offenders, the Home Office has confirmed.

The proposal, similar to the register signed by sex offenders, follows a government assessment of current anti-stalking laws.

Latest figures show there were 5,800 successful prosecutions of stalkers in England and Wales in 1998.

The announcement coincides with the launch of a guide to help police investigate stalkers.

Diana Lamplugh
Diana Lamplugh: Victims feel at fault
The Home Office evaluation has shown that more work needs to be done to train officers dealing with such cases.

Home Office minister Charles Clarke said: "Harassment can have a devastating effect on people's lives - it is something that must be tackled."

Anti-stalking guide

The Stalking Investigation Guide has been written by Detective Inspector Hamish Brown. It gives officers guidance on how to deal with harassment offences and give advice to victims.

He visited police in the US to see how they deal with the problem.

"Waiting outside someone's home and where they work, following them up and down the street - that sort of behaviour can amount to harassment and it is important the police appreciate that," said Mr Brown.

"People feel that it is only celebrities affected. But the overwhelming majority of victims are the ordinary people in the street."

Women's support groups have welcomed the release of the guide.

Diana Lamplugh, the mother of murdered estate agent Suzy Lamplugh, said: "It is about getting the police to fully understand what the laws mean and how they should work.

"The victims will come forward much quicker. At the moment they are made to feel stupid and they wonder if it's their fault.

"If the police take it very seriously early on there can be an early intervention and sometimes the stalker can be made to stop."

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

27 Apr 00 | Entertainment
Police warn Street 'stalker'
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories