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Thursday, 27 July, 2000, 13:46 GMT 14:46 UK
England lion to sell World Cup shirt
Sir Geoff Hurst and wax model
Soccer legend: Sir Geoff Hurst with his waxwork model
Sir Geoff Hurst is to auction the shirt he wore when England won the World Cup in 1966 along with a host of his other footballing memorabilia.

The England soccer hero is to allow a collection of more than 100 items to go under the hammer - including the red number 10 shirt he wore during the epic final against West Germany.

Money raised will go to the Bobby Moore Imperial Cancer Research Fund, named after Sir Geoff's World Cup winning captain, who died from the disease.

The auction is expected to raise more than 180,000 with the football shirt alone likely to raise between 20,000 and 30,000.


I'm as patriotic as the next Englishman and will always cherish my memories and the friendships I made in my playing days

Sir Geoff Hurst
Sir Geoff is the only man to score a hat-trick in a World Cup final.

He played alongside legendary figures, among them Moore, Bobby Charlton, Nobby Stiles and Alan Ball.

A blue World Cup 1966 international cap is also under the hammer, as well as 26 other international caps. They will be auctioned at Christie's in September.

Patriotic

Sir Geoff said: "I'm as patriotic as the next Englishman and will always cherish my memories and the friendships I made in my playing days.

"But at this stage in my life, I would rather have some control over the distribution of my medals and trophies and know that my family will benefit."

England's World Cup team
Triumph: England lift the World Cup
Some proceeds will go to his family and he said: "It was always my intention to leave the entire collection to my children.

"But I have three daughters - how do you fairly divide up this sort of collection?"

The entire collection is locked away after a "significant part" of it was stolen from his home.

Sir Geoff said: "Hopefully some of the memories can be relived by people seeing what you see in the auction."

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