Page last updated at 13:15 GMT, Friday, 5 February 2010

The charges laid over expense claims

Three Labour MPs and one Tory peer are to face criminal charges over their expenses claims.

Director of Public Prosecutions Keir Starmer said he had set up a panel of senior police officers and senior prosecuting lawyers to assess a number of complaints about MPs' expenses.

The four cases in which charges have been brought are:

ELLIOT MORLEY

Two charges under section 17 of the Theft Act 1968 for false accounting have been brought against Mr Morley MP.

The first charge alleges that between April 2004 and February 2006, Mr Morley dishonestly claimed mortgage expenses of £14,428, in excess of that to which he was entitled, in relation to a property in Winterton, Lincolnshire.

The second charge alleges that between March 2006 and November 2007 Mr Morley dishonestly claimed mortgage expenses of £16,000 for the same property when there was no longer a mortgage on that property.

DAVID CHAYTOR

Mr Chaytor is facing three charges under section 17 of the Theft Act 1968 for false accounting.

The first charge alleges that in May 2006 Mr Chaytor dishonestly claimed £1,950 for IT services by using false invoices.

The second charge alleges that between September 2005 and September 2006 Mr Chaytor dishonestly claimed £12,925, purportedly for renting a property in Regency Street, London, when he was in fact the owner of the property.

The third charge alleges that between September 2007 and January 2008 Mr Chaytor dishonestly claimed £5,425, purportedly for renting a property in Bury from his mother.

JIM DEVINE

Two charges under section 17 of the Theft Act 1968 for false accounting have been brought against Mr Devine.

The first charge alleges that between July 2008 and April 2009, Mr Devine dishonestly claimed £3,240 for cleaning services using false invoices. The second charge alleges that in March 2009, Mr Devine dishonestly claimed £5,505 for stationery using false invoices.

LORD HANNINGFIELD

Six charges under section 17 of the Theft Act 1968 for false accounting have been brought against Paul White, known as Lord Hanningfield.

The charges allege that between March 2006 and May 2009, Paul White dishonestly submitted claims for expenses to which he knew he was not entitled, including numerous claims for overnight expenses for staying in London when records show that he was driven home and did not stay overnight in London.

FURTHER INVESTIGATIONS

Mr Starmer said that after "careful scrutiny of all the evidence gathered in the investigation, we have concluded that there is insufficient evidence to provide a realistic prospect of a conviction" in a fifth case that had been under consideration.

He added: "In view of the considerable public interest in the cases currently under consideration, I have decided to identify Lord Clarke of Hampstead as the individual in question in this case. Since criminal proceedings are now active in respect of the four individuals charged, it would not be appropriate for me to comment further on Lord Clarke's case at this stage."

Mr Starmer also said there was a sixth case still under consideration and that the criminal investigation into it was ongoing.



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05 Feb 10 |  UK Politics

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