Page last updated at 08:00 GMT, Saturday, 12 December 2009

Pocket money 'rose by 11p a week on average' in 2009

Child saving money in a piggy bank
Some 77% of children said they wanted to learn more about saving

British children received an average of £6.24 a week in pocket money this year, a slight rise despite the recession, according to research.

The figure is up from £6.13 in 2008, but is still well below the average amount in 2005 of £8.37 a week.

A survey of 1,202 children aged between eight and 15 for the Halifax bank found that boys typically received just over a pound more than girls.

A third of the children said they saved at least some of their money each week.

Lucky Londoners

Research found that children aged 12 to 15 were given an average of £7.44 a week, while those between eight and 11 got £4.80.

Youngsters in London received the most money - about £10.79 a week - followed by those in the north east of England with £6.86.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, parents in south west England and East Anglia were the least generous, giving £4.50 and £4.91 respectively.

It's great to see that so many children are saving
Flavia Palacios Umana, Halifax

Across the country, boys received an average of £6.88, compared with girls' £5.58.

Just under half of children who received pocket money said they had been given a rise during 2009.

The survey revealed mixed attitudes towards saving, with 49% saying they put aside at least half of their pocket money, but a quarter admitting they spent every penny.

While one in four children said they would save up if there was something expensive they wanted, 17% confessed they would rather resort to pester power to get it.

But an encouraging 77% of those surveyed said they wanted to know more about saving.

Flavia Palacios Umana, from Halifax, said: "It's great to see that so many children are saving and actively seeking to learn more about it.

"This hopefully will instil a firm foundation of a healthy savings habit."



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