Page last updated at 10:56 GMT, Saturday, 10 October 2009 11:56 UK

Philip rails against TV controls

Duke of Edinburgh: "You end up lying on the floor with a torch in your teeth"

The Duke of Edinburgh has attacked the complexity of television sets and remote controls, giving a rare glimpse of life inside the Windsor household.

Prince Philip said the quality of design had in some areas declined, and he picked televisions as an example.

Harking back to an age when televisions were simple, he said: "To work out how to operate a TV set you practically have to make love to the thing."

You had to lie on the floor with a torch and magnifying glass, he said.

The duke was speaking in an interview celebrating the 50th anniversary of a Design Council prize in his name.

Why can't you have a handset that people who are not 10 years old can actually read?
Prince Philip

He told the presenter of Channel 4's Grand Designs, Kevin McCloud, that he was impressed by the new generation of designers, and it was important to celebrate them.

But some technology had caused him frustration.

"They put the [TV] controls on the bottom so you had to lie on the floor, and then if you wanted to record something the recorder was underneath, so you ended up lying on the floor with a torch in your teeth, a magnifying glass and an instruction book.

"Either that or you had to employ a grandson of age 10 to do it for you."

He added: "And why can't you have a handset that people who are not 10 years old can actually read?"

He also railed against fascia panels in cars, because they were sometimes unreadable due to light reflections.

And he complained about car fuel gauges because they only told drivers how much fuel was left, not how much was needed to refill.

The full interview with Prince Philip, who is patron of the Chartered Society of Designers, can be seen on the Royal Channel on YouTube.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific