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Friday, 30 June, 2000, 21:24 GMT 22:24 UK
Bobby Moore's medal haul sold
Bobby Moore in 1966
Bobby Moore's World Cup winners' medal is among the items sold
English soccer legend Bobby Moore's collection of medals and trophies have been bought by his former team, West Ham United.

The 79 items will be put on public display at the team's museum in London's Upton Park.

The most spectacular article is the gold medal presented at Wembley Stadium to Moore by the Queen after England's 1966 World Cup victory over Germany.

International caps, trophies and other medals are also among the collection bid for at Christie's auction house.

'Most illustrious player'

West Ham United chairman Terry Brown said: "Bobby Moore was undoubtedly our most illustrious player.

"This collection and our new museum can only enhance Bobby's story, and will, I hope, help future generations to understand what a magnificent player he was."

He confirmed that the Moore collection would become the focal point of a museum being incorporated into the club's new ground redevelopment.

The BBC Sportsview Personality of the Year trophy received as England team Captain, and the FA Cup and European Cup-Winners' Cup medals won during his time as centre-half are also part of the collection.

Moore, who died of cancer in 1993, joined West Ham in 1958 and made a record 642 League and Cup appearances for the team, playing 1,000 matches before joining Fulham in 1974.

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