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Sunday, 25 June, 2000, 23:52 GMT 00:52 UK
Dome bonuses despite cuts
Millennium Dome
Staff will receive bonuses despite 29m of cutbacks
Managers and staff at the troubled Millennium Dome are to receive bonus payments despite the attraction's financial crisis.

Reports that more than 6m has been set aside to make the payments have been dismissed as "ridiculously over-hyped" by a Dome spokesman, who said the figure was nearer 2m



Everyone who has worked on this project has worked between two and three times the hours they are paid for

Dome spokesman
The bonuses are to ensure staff stay to the end of their fixed-term contracts.

The payouts will be made despite a round of cutbacks costing up to 29 million, including the axing of "land trains" for the elderly and disabled and the abandonment of late opening during the summer.

The spokesman said the Dome's 350 managers would receive bonuses based on how long they had been working there, calculated as a percentage of their salary.

He added that the 6m figure incorrectly estimated the average salary at 50,000, and assumed they would all serve out their time.

Cutbacks

The 900 hosts at the Dome would receive less, around 10% of their salaries.

The four board directors, including former chief executive Jennie Page, are eligible to share a maximum of 500,000 in performance-related bonuses.

The spokesman said: "The figures that have been quoted are ridiculously over-hyped.

"The amount I would get, for example, would only be enough to last for a month. I wish I was earning 50,000 but it is nowhere near that.


Jennie Page
Jennie Page: Eligable for a bonus
"Everyone who has worked on this project has worked between two and three times the hours they are paid for, in any case."

Trapeze artists and technicians who stage the Dome's most popular attraction, are excluded because they are paid under separate union agreements.

Last month the Millennium Commission gave the struggling attraction a further 29m of National Lottery money.

It would have been made bankrupt without the massive injection, said the New Millennium experience Company.

The attraction has already received 538m of lottery money in total.

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24 May 00 | UK
MPs demand Dome inquiry
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