Page last updated at 03:37 GMT, Friday, 8 May 2009 04:37 UK

Victory for customers in bra war

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Beckie Williams: frustrated by prices - first broadcast May 2008

Marks and Spencer has agreed to end its policy of charging more for larger bras after a campaign by customers.

The store took out adverts in Friday's newspapers admitting it had "boobed" and promising to standardise prices.

The "Busts for Justice" campaign was led by Beckie Williams, a 30G. Her Facebook group attracted more than 13,000 supporters.

Marks and Spencer had added an extra £2 to bras larger than a DD cup on the grounds that they cost more to make.

It is bringing all prices in line permanently, and as a goodwill gesture between 9 and 25 May will be offering a 25% discount on all bras.

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Miss Williams, 26, from Brighton, was so angry that she bought a £3.40 share in Marks and Spencer to allow her to confront chairman Sir Stuart Rose at the next annual meeting in July.

She labelled the surcharge "unfair" and "ridiculous," while other members of the Facebook group called for a boycott.

Marks and Spencer initially said bigger-busted customers were happy to pay a small premium for the specialist work needed to ensure a suitable level of support.

But on Friday the company backed down.

A spokesman said: "We've heard what our customers are telling us that they are unhappy with the pricing on our DD-plus bras and that basically we've boobed.

"So from Saturday 9 May no matter what size you buy, the price is going to be the same."

On Wednesday, supermarket Asda weighed into the row by unveiling a £4 bra in cup sizes A to F as part of its George range.

Fiona Lambert, George's brand director, said: "No one would dream of charging one price for size seven men's socks and a different price for a man with larger feet, so why should they do the same with ladies that are blessed in the chest department?"



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