Page last updated at 21:38 GMT, Tuesday, 21 April 2009 22:38 UK

Judge rejects G20 footage ban bid

Ian Tomlinson
Ian Tomlinson died after he was pushed over by a police officer

An attempt to stop new footage being broadcast of the moments leading up to the death of Ian Tomlinson has failed.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) tried to secure a court order preventing Channel 4 News showing the film of the G20 protests.

But a judge refused to grant the injunction and the footage will be shown on Wednesday.

The IPCC said the film could damage its investigation, but ITN said it was a "responsible piece of journalism".

An IPCC spokeswoman said: "We can confirm that we attempted to seek an injunction this evening against Channel 4 as it came to light that they were due to broadcast further evidence which we believe at this moment would potentially damage our criminal investigation into the death of Ian Tomlinson.

"This injunction was specific to what was due to be broadcast this evening."

Suspension

A spokeswoman for ITN, which produces Channel 4 News and More 4 News, said the broadcast was "a responsible piece of journalism that brings important new information into the public domain".

Mr Tomlinson, a 47-year-old newspaper vendor, died minutes after he was pushed over by a policeman during demonstrations in central London on 1 April.

The police officer at the centre of the allegations has been suspended and interviewed under caution on suspicion of manslaughter in connection with the death.

He was filmed hitting the newspaper seller with his baton and pushing him to the ground.



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