Page last updated at 05:56 GMT, Thursday, 5 March 2009

Papers examine Brown's US sojourn

Papers
The Daily Telegraph's front page features Gordon Brown speaking in Washington, showing the prime minister with both arms raised in an expansive gesture.

"Brown appeals for help to save world" is the paper's headline. In the Times, his backdrop includes the motto of the United States - "In God we trust".

A cartoon in the Independent, and a Daily Mirror headline, both rewrite the phrase as "In Gord we trust".

The Independent judges that Mr Brown's trip to Washington was a success.

Outraged

The Daily Mail is outraged to learn 65 murderers released from prison went on to re-offend - their crimes including three murders and three rapes.

The Mail says politicians broke the promise made when capital punishment was abolished, that "life meant life".

The Times has no doubt that the latest findings about council services for children are "an appalling indictment".

It fears a future in which tens of thousands of children could be at risk of abuse, neglect and illiteracy.

Broken Britain

The Sun and the Daily Mirror lead on the conviction of Karl Bishop for murdering the teenage actor Rob Knox, who appeared in the last Harry Potter film.

The Sun highlights the grief and anger of the actor's parents - calling the crime an appalling tragedy that lays bare the nightmare of Broken Britain.

The Mirror says police failed to arrest Bishop for an earlier knife crime.

Its headline "Let Loose to Kill" claims detectives failed to interview him for the crime, although he was the suspect.

Declining income

ITV chairman Michael Grade is shown with hands raised in apparent surrender on the Financial Times's front page.

His gesture sums up the broadcaster's hardships as it battles plunging profits and declining audiences.

A cartoon in the Daily Telegraph offers a vision of a future broadcast - made by a presenter who is himself holding the camera into which he speaks.

The Daily Express predicts cuts - its cartoon shows a couple settling down to watch the "news at nine-and-a-half".

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