Page last updated at 04:57 GMT, Thursday, 5 March 2009

Prison group attacks Bronson film

Bronson billboard
This billboard can be seen near to where Bronson is being held

A film about a notorious British criminal has been condemned by prison officers for glorifying violence.

Bronson tells the story of Charles Bronson, the man described as the country's most dangerous prisoner.

Bronson, 56, who is held at Wakefield jail, was jailed for armed robbery in 1974 but has committed a string of crimes behind bars, including assaults.

The Prison Officers' Association said he had caused trauma to hard-working people who would never work again.

The former bare-knuckle fighter was jailed for seven years for armed robbery in 1974 and has been incarcerated for a string of crimes while behind bars, including hostage-taking, assaults and rooftop protests.

He has spent only four months out of custody since 1974 and most of his time in prison has been in solitary confinement.

Now aged 56, he was born Michael Peterson in Aberystwyth, west Wales, but his name was changed by his fight promoter in 1987.

We should not be glorifying this type of behaviour
Colin Moses, national chairman of the Prison Officers' Association

While in prison, Bronson has developed an extreme fitness regime and occupies himself by writing poetry and producing pieces of art.

The film about his life is released on 13 March, reportedly two days after Bronson goes before the Parole Board to try to win his freedom.

Colin Moses, national chairman of the Prison Officers' Association, said: "We should not be glorifying this type of behaviour. This man has spent the best part of his life behind bars for causing harm to people.

"He has caused trauma to hard-working, law-abiding people who will never work again. Bronson is not a victim, he is the perpetrator."

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