Page last updated at 15:22 GMT, Sunday, 18 January 2009

Mixed-race family rise 'dramatic'

Libby, Chelsea, Kevin and Denise in EastEnders
EastEnders' Kevin and Denise were a high-profile TV mixed-race couple

Nearly one in 10 UK children live in a mixed-race family, a study suggests.

It said mixed-race partnerships were now so commonplace that some ethnic groups, such as Afro-Caribbean, were expected to virtually disappear.

Researchers said they believed future generations would "not see race in the way we see it", the Observer reported.

Lucinda Platt, author of the report for Essex University's Institute of Social and Economic Research, said it was a "dramatic" change.

'Remain vigilant'

Half of all British men with Caribbean heritage are in a relationship with partners of a different race, according to the research.

One in five black African men, one in 10 Indian men and women and two out of five Chinese women are also in a relationship with a partner from another race.

Now, one in five children belongs to an ethnic minority - a proportion far higher compared with the adult population, the Observer reported.

Trevor Phillips, chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), is reported to have said he would "celebrate" the study's findings, but will add that there are still racial problems in Britain.

A spokeswoman for the commission told the paper: "We need to be alert to tensions within communities that may be exacerbated by economic downturn, and to remain vigilant against discrimination and divisiveness - particularly across boundaries of faith."

The report, commissioned by the EHRC, found 9% of children are of "mixed or multiple heritage" - they live with parents from different ethnic groups, or are themselves of mixed ethnicity.

Over the past 14 years the number of children of Caribbean heritage with a white parent has increased from 39% to 49%.

Among the UK's Indian population it has risen from 3% to 11%, for the Pakistani population from 1% to 4%, and for Chinese people from 15% to 35%.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Is this the last taboo?
12 Jun 06 |  Magazine
An embarrassment no more
24 Nov 05 |  Magazine

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2019 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific