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Monday, 13 April, 1998, 13:54 GMT 14:54 UK
Families demand inquiry into germ tests
scientist
The government says the tests were harmless
Biological warfare tests carried out by the Ministry of Defence in the 1960s have been blamed for birth defects and miscarriages in parts of Dorset.

Families affected are now calling for full details of bacteria that were released into the sea at East Lulworth, near Weymouth.

Lulworth
The people of East Lulworth want to know more
They will hold a public meeting on Monday to discuss how to force a public inquiry.

Scientists tracked and recorded the bacteria's progress inland to try to assess how real germ warfare would affect the population.

The government only admitted carrying out the tests last year, but insists they were harmless.

The residents of East Lulworth are not convinced, though, blaming the bacteria for illnesses, miscarriages and disabilities.

Rogers
Tracey Rogers is campaigning for a full investigation
Campaigner Tracey Rogers said: "All my bodily functions are not working properly, so that ranges from my digestive system to my hormones to my muscles with pain and in my joints."

The MoD says all four types of bacteria released were safe. Two were dead, another occurs naturally in the environment and a fourth, a strain of E.coli, is present in human intestines.

However, it is now facing calls for independent tests as part of a full investigation.

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Tracey Rogers says her health has been seriously affected (19")
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