The Estate



Seacroft
Housing estates have been an integral part of British life for decades.

Many were built in the years after World War II to provide a better standard of living for millions of people. Some estates are success stories but others are among the most deprived places in the UK.

The Seacroft estate in Leeds was begun in the post-War years. It has continued to expand and around 18,000 people now live there. Part of it is judged to be within England's 10% most deprived locations.

Over the past two months, the BBC's Nicola Pearson has been spending time with people who live and work in Seacroft. These are some of their stories.


The school The businessman High-rise living Growing up Working mens club The family Seacroft Map

Warning To view the interactive content on this page you need Javascript enabled and Flash player installed. Download Flash here

The school

Seacroft's new secondary school is the David Young Community Academy.
Some of its pupils come from deprived backgrounds, but principal Ros McMullen has high ambitions for every child.

The businessman

Philip Stead runs the butcher's shop in Seacroft. He says he's seen a drop in trade as homes fall into disrepair and people move out of the area.

High-rise living

Pensioner Dorothy Wall has lived in one of Seacroft's high-rise blocks for 25 years. She is fiercely proud of the estate and its community spirit.

Growing up

Many young people on the estate complain there isn't much to do.
Youth workers Claire Billingham and Ian Wigglesworth run projects aimed at getting local teenagers off the streets at night.

Working men's club

The Seacroft Working Men's Club has 4,000 members. It is busiest on Friday and Saturday nights when people go to drink, socialise, play bingo and watch local acts perform.

The family

Gina Morrison lives with her husband and four children in a three-bedroom house. It angers her when people refer to where she lives as a "sink estate".

The school

The school

The businessman

The businessman

High-rise living

High-rise living

Growing up

Growing up

Working men's club

Working men's club

The family

The family




FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2013 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific