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Tuesday, 30 May, 2000, 01:16 GMT 02:16 UK
Aristocratic pate protest
Duck
The couple insist Jenners is ducking its responsibilities
An upper crust trade war has begun between a duke and duchess and a department store.

The Duke and Duchess of Hamilton have stopped shopping at Edinburgh department store Jenners because it refuses to stop stocking pate de foie gras.


I don't particularly want to shop in any store that serves pate de foie gras

Duchess of Hamilton

The couple launched their campaign after the store refused a plea by the duchess not to sell the delicacy, which some animal lovers believe is made cruelly by force-feeding geese and ducks.

The duke said: "My wife will miss going there. She used to rather like going there.

"It's a real sacrifice for her. She buys clothing there - not particularly expensive clothing, but good value for money.

Value for money

"She doesn't go because it's a posh place to shop but because she used to get quite good value for money for clothing.

"But it's Asda from now on."

The duchess has been a customer at Jenners for years and the Duke, 61, said he could recall first going there as a boy in wartime.

The duchess said: "I don't particularly want to shop in any store that serves pate de foie gras.

"I feel it is something everybody ought to give up."

Managing director Andrew Douglas-Miller said: "We have gone to great lengths to choose a supplier that complies with the strict regulation and certification in the making of this product.

"Like many food halls and delicatessens up and down the country we stock it because a number of our customers ask for it.

"We have a duty to those customers and will continue to stock pate de foie gras."

Family precedent

The duke said he was not a vegetarian, but was opposed to the product on cruelty grounds.

He said the action taken by him and his wife followed a family precedent set in the 1920s by the then Duchess of Hamilton, his grandmother Nina.

"She was a pioneer in things like slaughterhouse reform and the use of the humane killer," he said.

"In those days the way to kill a pig was to hang it upside down and slit its throat so it bled to death.

"And my grandmother was very successful in advocating a new approach in the way we treated animals."

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