Page last updated at 05:29 GMT, Saturday, 4 October 2008 06:29 UK

Shock at Mandelson's return

Papers
Peter Mandelson's shock return to Cabinet as an ally of Gordon Brown is the topic most of the papers have dissected.

The Times claims the prime minister has taken a big risk by hiring Mr Mandelson calling it the "most daring reshuffle of modern times".

The Guardian believes Mr Brown's cabinet reshuffle was the equivalent of a "political thunderbolt".

'Disreputable'

It calls the move "one of the most brilliant coups" of Mr Brown's career.

The mid-markets and the tabloids all have an opinion on the new business secretary too.

The Sun starts panto season early with the headline "I'm Behind You" - referring to Mr Mandelson's and Mr Brown's new "friendly" relationship.

The Daily Mail condemns the appointment outright and claims Gordon Brown has hauled Labour back to its "worst days of sleaze".

Columnist Richard Littlejohn is scathing and brands Mr Mandelson "the living embodiment of all that is rotten and disreputable about New Labour".

The Daily Mirror says Mr Mandelson will head the "credit crunch crusade".

Banking worries

The Daily Express congratulates the United States Congress for saving the world's economy by agreeing to the biggest banking bail-out of all time.

But the Financial Times claims the banks have still got troubles ahead. A crackdown is due on the large profits which lenders make from insurance products.

The Telegraph reports on Ammon Shea's unusual hobby. He has just finished reading the 22,000-page Oxford English Dictionary from cover to cover.

It only took him a year to go from A-Z.

Hungry crocodiles

Television stars Richard and Judy admit to the Sun that they smoked marijuana a few times, but say they are telling their children to stay off drugs.

Meanwhile the Mirror reports that reckless cyclists in Cambridge should watch out - the police are being issued with whistles to stop them.

The Times has pictures of a seven-year-old boy who broke into an Australian zoo and fed rare lizards to a hungry crocodile.

But he is too young to be prosecuted.

The zoo is considering legal action against his parents.


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