BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK
Front Page 
World 
UK 
England 
Northern Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


The BBC's Darren Jordon
"The exuberance of small children can often spill over to aggression"
 real 28k

Tuesday, 23 May, 2000, 05:21 GMT 06:21 UK
Musical chairs 'too violent'
A government-backed booklet says musical chairs encourages agression because the fastest and strongest child wins
The booklet says children should be taught to co-operate
The traditional children's party game of musical chairs has been accused of breeding violence.

A booklet, launched by the Education Minister Margaret Hodge, says that nursery schools should consider playing a less aggressively competitive game - such as musical statues.

Towards a Non-Violent Society, the booklet produced by the Forum on Children and Violence, argues that musical chairs only rewards the "strongest and fastest".



Political correctness gone mad

Theresa May, Shadow Education Secretary
The Department for Education has distanced itself from the publication, saying that it neither funds nor distributes the booklet - and it says there is no ban on the game being advocated.

Instead it says that the booklet "merely advises that teachers might think of less confrontational alternatives".

But the Conservative education spokeswoman, Theresa May, called the advice "political correctness gone mad".

"Children have playedand enjoyed musical chairs for years," she said.

"This is yet more interference by a government, not content with just telling teachers what to do, they are now telling children what games they can and cannot play."

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

22 Dec 99 | Education
Nursery children more popular
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories