Page last updated at 12:45 GMT, Tuesday, 26 August 2008 13:45 UK

Peaches and the paparazzi

Pippa Gardner meets the man fed up of the paparazzi

Many people might dream of having a celebrity living in their neighbourhood - at the very least it is certainly a claim to fame and something to tell your mates down the pub.

But for one man living in north London the day a star moved in next door was the the start of months of noise and disruption which he says is now very annoying. Your News went to meet him.

Paul Convery has lived in his neighbourhood for many years. He described it as quiet and peaceful - that was until Peaches Geldof moved in next door.

Nineteen year old Peaches is hot property at the moment. Her recent marriage to rocker Max Drummey is the latest thing to get her in the headlines.

"A real bad night starts at two in the morning. There'll be flash guns popping, scuffling, commotion, slamming of doors, people rushing to get the picture."

"A real bad night starts at two in the morning. There'll be flash guns popping, scuffling, commotion, slamming of doors, people rushing to get the picture.
Paul Convery

A picture of her can earn a photographer a lot of money and for the many paparazzi getting the perfect shot is certainly worth the wait - even if that means hours spent hanging around the house where she lives.

On some nights the entire street can be packed with photographers - which some neighbours say creates big problems.

Peaches Geldof
A picture of Peaches can fetch a lot of money
"When you see things like drunk the night before, fell out of a taxi, got married - my heart kind of sinks because I know that for the rest of the week there's going to be half a dozen guys camped outside on the street trying to get pictures of her coming and going."

Paul doesn't have a problem with Peaches just the attention she attracts.

"That is kind of chaotic in a neighbourhood like this."

Legally there's not much Paul and the other neighbours who are bothered by the disturbance can do to get the snappers to leave. The best they can hope for is that some other celebrity living elsewhere makes more news.

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