Page last updated at 16:44 GMT, Friday, 15 August 2008 17:44 UK

'No proof' of harm to Madeleine

Madeleine McCann
Mr McCann said he was surprised the media were given copies of police files

Gerry McCann, the father of missing Madeleine McCann, has made his first public comments since police in Portugal released files into her case.

He said he and his wife Kate strongly believed that Madeleine was out there and could be found.

"It will be clear to everyone now, that there is absolutely no evidence that suggests Madeleine has been seriously harmed," he wrote in his blog.

Madeleine disappeared, aged three, during a holiday in Portugal in 2007.

Writing on their campaign website Mr McCann said: "Of course whoever is responsible for Madeleine's abduction must, and can be, found to prevent them from putting another child and family through the misery we have suffered.

"Our investigators continue to explore credible leads and will continue to do so as long as Madeleine is missing.

"Now that the authorities are no longer looking for Madeleine we implore everyone who has provided information to the inquiry to contact us."

Case shelved

Thousands of documents from a massive dossier of evidence assembled by detectives over more than 14 months were made public last week.

They included forensic reports, witness statements, police intelligence and details of hundreds of possible sightings of Madeleine reported around the world.

Mr McCann said he had been surprised that copies of the files had been given to the media.

Mr and Mrs McCann, both 40, from Rothley, Leicestershire, had been named as "arguidos", or formal suspects, in Madeleine's disappearance, but this status was lifted with the shelving of the case three weeks ago.


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