Page last updated at 01:29 GMT, Thursday, 1 May 2008 02:29 UK

NSPCC launches trafficking poster

NSPCC poster
The poster will be distributed across the UK

A poster campaign aimed at tackling trafficking of children has been launched by the NSPCC.

The children's charity is to distribute 2,000 copies of the image to hospitals, ports and transport companies, urging staff to watch out for youngsters.

Trafficked children are said to mostly enter on false ID documents while separated from their families.

The NSPCC is appealing to those who "might come across them at the various stages of their journey".

It said trafficked youngsters are rarely registered with GPs, meaning they frequently turn up in hospital accident and emergency departments.

NSPCC spokeswoman Mandy John-Baptiste said: "Many children are not told the truth about why they are being brought to this country.

"They may think they are coming for a better life but in fact end up being abused and exploited by being forced to sell sex, become domestic slaves or used in benefit fraud."

She said the charity was appealing to people such as immigration officers, coach drivers and nurses "to be alert".

The posters are to be distributed across the UK. The NSPCC's free helpline can be reached on 0800 107 7057.


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