Page last updated at 12:51 GMT, Sunday, 27 April 2008 13:51 UK

Blues drivers 'top speeding list'

Meatloaf, the singer
Bat Out Of Hell by Meatloaf was the number one driving song

Drivers who listen to blues music in their cars are the most likely to be caught speeding, according to a survey.

They are followed by country music listeners and then reggae and hip-hop fans.

A total of 49% of drivers who listened to blues and 45% of those who tuned in to country said they had committed a speeding offence.

The poll, by Saga Motor Insurance, found that Meat Loaf's Bat Out Of Hell was the most popular driving song.

More than 2,000 adults were interviewed for the survey and 79% of these said they listened to music while in their cars.

Rock and pop music was the most popular style of music for drivers, with 65% choosing it, while 39% went for easy listening.

Around 22% of drivers who listened to talk-based radio stations admitted having a minor accident, compared with 78% who listened to music.

Runner-up to Meat Loaf in the list of favourite driving songs was Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody, with Steppenwolf's Born To Be Wild third and Queen's Don't Stop Me Now fourth.

UK's favourite driving songs
1. Bat Out Of Hell - Meat Loaf
2. Bohemian Rhapsody - Queen
3. Born To Be Wild - Steppenwolf
4 Don't Stop Me Now - Queen
5 Hotel California - The Eagles

Saga Group chief executive Andrew Goodsell said the songs people like best while driving are still the golden oldies.

He added: "Interestingly, the research shows that, although certain types of music are often thought of as having a relaxing effect on the listener, there is no proof that this results in a more tempered driving style."




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