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Friday, April 3, 1998 Published at 14:02 GMT 15:02 UK



UK

Pair jailed for stealing body parts
image: [ Kelly used body parts as moulds for his sculptures ]
Kelly used body parts as moulds for his sculptures

An artist and an embalmer have been sentenced to jail for stealing body parts which were used to make sculptures.

Anthony-Noel Kelly, 42, and Niel Lyndsay, 25, were convicted of taking remains from the Royal College of Surgeons in London.


[ image: Lyndsay was a laboratory technician]
Lyndsay was a laboratory technician
They are the first people ever to be convicted in Britain for stealing body parts.

After legal discussions on Friday afternoon, the judge sentenced Kelly to nine months imprisonment, four-and-a-half months suspended, and Lyndsay received a six-month suspended sentence.


Dr Laurence Martin alerted police after seeing an exhibition of Kelly's work (''22).
The government inspector who monitors the use of human remains in medical research brought the matter to the attention of police after seeing an exhibition of Kelly's work.

Dr Laurence Martin told the BBC: "I was convinced that the pictures in the newspaper I saw in January of last year showed human material as a basis for what were called sculptures.


[ image: Dr Martin alerted police]
Dr Martin alerted police
"I considered that these could not have been made except by casting or moulding of actual parts."

Officers arrested Kelly last April at his studio. They found plaster moulds of human body parts and later discovered a gruesome collection of heads, legs and torsos at another flat and buried in a field in Kent.


[ image: Body parts were found in Kelly's studio]
Body parts were found in Kelly's studio
Kelly, a former butcher, had been given special permission to sketch the college's unique collection of human remains.

He enlisted the help of Lyndsay, a laboratory technician at the college, to smuggle dozens of body parts out.

For more than a year, Lindsay ferried the remains in black plastic bags on London Underground trains or by taxi to Kelly's studio.


[ image: Remains were carried on the tube]
Remains were carried on the tube
In court, both men said the parts had been abandoned by the college and that they would be used by Kelly then buried with dignity, rather than being left to rot in a basement.

But the jury at Southwark Crown Court rejected both men's claims that they had done nothing wrong.








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