Page last updated at 10:38 GMT, Thursday, 3 April 2008 11:38 UK

Terminal 5 ready for full flights

Delayed passengers on Friday
Many passengers faced delays or cancellations at T5's launch

Heathrow's Terminal 5 will operate a full schedule of flights on Saturday, British Airways has said.

It will be the first day of normal operation for the terminal, which was plagued by problems on its opening day.

Scores of flights have been cancelled by the airline over the past week in order to take pressure off overloaded baggage handling systems.

On Thursday BA cancelled 34 flights, fewer than the previous two days when more than 50 services did not fly.

The weekend schedule is less busy than the weekday timetable, a spokeswoman for BA said.

Almost 250 flights in and out of T5 were cancelled during its first four days because of glitches with its new baggage-handling system.

These included glitches with its new baggage-handling system, a temporary suspension of luggage check-in and staff familiarisation problems.

Rocky start

Baggage handlers are still sorting through 14,000 pieces of luggage lost as flights took off with passengers but no bags on board.

Bags being returned to addresses in mainland Europe have been sent to Milan where they are being sorted by a contractor.

The terminal's VIP section was a possible entry point for the Olympic torch on Saturday but it is to arrive at another building.

T5's rocky start has prompted calls from the Conservatives for an inquiry into the "chaos and confusion", with shadow home secretary David Davis calling the situation "a dreadful national embarrassment".

T5's problems have led BA to consider postponing the transfer of its long-haul operations at Terminal 4 to the new building, which had been scheduled for the end of April.




SEE ALSO
Terminal 5 chaos costs BA 16m
03 Apr 08 |  Business


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