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The BBC's Darren Jordon
"Not so much Bobbies on the beat as Bobbies on skates"
 real 28k

Wednesday, 12 April, 2000, 07:15 GMT 08:15 UK
Rollercop to the rescue
Regent's Park
Regent's Park will be patrolled by rollercops
Modern policing is set to take on a whole new meaning as police in central London prepare to patrol parks on roller blades.

Four officers - three women and a man - with the Royal Parks Constabulary will form an in-line skating patrol to be unveiled in Kensington Gardens.

Pc Ken Hynd and Wpcs Stacey Loader, Angie Greneski and Janice Jarvis will don their roller blades in an attempt to improve community policing in some of London's most famous parks.

All four have been taught by a qualified in-line skating instructor not only how to stay on their feet, but how to chase suspects safely and how to fall without injuring themselves.
Rollercops
The 21st century police officer
Each member of the patrol will wear special detachable blades which can be quickly released if, for example, they have to climb up a steep hill or chase a suspect across a gravel drive.

Wide remit

They will be given distinctive uniforms, consisting of white polo shirts, navy sweatshirts and black combat trousers.

The foursome will have a wide remit, ranging from giving park users directions to tackling muggers, cracking down on drug dealing and keeping an eye out for paedophiles and other undesirables.

They are also responsible for making sure the Royal Parks Regulations are not broken.

Roller-blading patrols in France, the Netherlands and the United States have already proved successful.

Inspector Ron Cook, Head of the Royal Parks Constabulary's community section, said: "The in-line officers will respond to calls like any conventional patrol.

"The difference is that they can travel more easily, when the parks are full of people, than officers in cars and on bicycles, and will often be the first on the scene.

"This innovative patrol is another example of our partnership approach with the public, and will help to reassure visitors that they can safely enjoy the Royal Parks."

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