Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: UK
Front Page 
World 
UK 
Northern Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Sport 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 
Monday, 13 March, 2000, 10:04 GMT
Searching for tranquility
Countryside
Noise Network: In search of peace
Anti-noise campaigners are compiling a directory of tranquil retreats where people can escape the sounds and stresses of modern life.

The Noise Network, a voluntary organisation based at Chatham, Kent, has compiled a list of places and properties in Britain away from heavy traffic, airports and noisy leisure activities.


Trying to find somewhere to visit, or stay, that offers a tranquil environment is getting more difficult on this small island of ours

Val Weedon
Noise network
Natural sounds such as singing birds or babbling brooks are fine and could earn a site a place on the quiet list.

But a motorway's roar or an airport's flight path would immediately get a prospective site - or property - struck off.

Background music is also frowned upon by those in search of a peaceful retereat.

And any hotel or bed and breakfast looking for a place on the quiet list must not cater for functions likely to attract boisterous crowds - although sound insulated rooms are a bonus.

Quiet campaign

Val Weedon, founder and national co-ordinator of the Noise Network, said: "Trying to find somewhere to visit, or stay, that offers a tranquil environment is getting more difficult on this small island of ours.

UK quiet spots
Grasmere, Cumbria
Exmoor, Devon
British Museum, London
Rievaulx Abbey, North Yorkshire
Old Shrewsbury Canal, Shropshire
"We thought it would be a good idea to compile a directory especially for those people seeking an alternative lifestyle to a noisy holiday, or just a chance to recuperate from a stressful period in their life."

The Noise Network wants the Government to produce policy guidelines that will improve planning and bring nuisance law up to date.

The group says good quality sound insulation should be the right of every citizen and consumers should demand quieter products, while manufacturers should be encouraged to produce them.

It also says air traffic should be strictly controlled, while offshore airports could be an alternative to expanding the current terminals.
Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

17 Feb 00 | UK
Birmingham maps out noise
25 Dec 99 | Northern Ireland
New laws target noisy neighbours
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to other UK stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more UK stories