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Thursday, 17 February, 2000, 00:50 GMT
Drinkers' spirits rise

bar More people are trying a variety of drinks


British drinkers are becoming more adventurous in their tastes, according to new research.

The UK - traditionally a nation of tea drinkers and beer lovers - is beginning to mix and match its alcohol more than ever.

Cider, tequila and pre-mixed spirits are all growing in popularity, especially among younger people, says the report by market analysts Datamonitor.

The researchers also identified a trend in "repertoire drinking", where customers abandon strict loyalties to single brands in favour of having a variety of drinks suited to different occasions.

They will try different tipples depending on their mood and the occasion.

Travel broadens the palate

Manufacturers are responding by producing different kinds of drinks with the same brand name.

Sales of tequila are up from 38m in 1995 to 47m in 1999, in line with a more worldly view from increasing numbers of well-travelled customers, the report said.

But the UK lager market is still continuing to grow and is expected to be worth 8.1bn by the end of 2000.

The research also found the fad phase for alcoholic soft drinks has passed. Consumers have dropped them in favour of pre-mixed spirits.

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See also:
02 Mar 99 |  UK
Breezer or Brooksider?
20 Jan 99 |  British lifestyles
A lifestyle of leisure
27 Jun 98 |  Health
Alcopops 'can rot teeth'
07 May 99 |  The Company File
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22 Jun 99 |  The Economy
Real ale loses its froth

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