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Last Updated: Tuesday, 13 March 2007, 06:43 GMT
The 'great green debate' pondered
Newspapers (generic)
The papers highlight and try to make sense of what the Mirror calls the great green debate.  

Cartoons in several papers feature Chancellor Gordon Brown and the Conservative leader David Cameron, doing battle for the green vote.  

Meanwhile, the Times says their speeches on Monday outlined two rival visions that put the planet at the heart of policy.  

The political background, it says, is no longer blue or red, but green.

Election 'green' battle

As papers address the green debate, the Daily Mail sees battle lines being drawn for the next election.

  The Express says there are legitimate concerns, but dismisses politicians' approach as "a lot of hot air."  

The paper says it is ludicrous that Britain should make "unique sacrifices" when it accounts for such a tiny proportion of global greenhouse gas emissions.  

A common approach is needed with America, China and other major polluters, it says.

Mandelson interview

The Guardian lead says Peter Mandelson criticised Tony Blair for the way he granted concessions to Sinn Fein during the peace process negotiations.

The former Northern Ireland secretary accused Mr Blair of "unreasonable and irresponsible" behaviour over the move.  

The interview is part of a series of articles examining Mr Blair's handling of the peace process.  

Mr Mandelson's spokesman said the comments were "over amplified", but the Guardian says it stands by its report.

'Cool down'

A leading economist says interest rates need to go above 8% to cool down the property boom, the Daily Mail reports.  

The warning was by Martin Weale of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research.  

Unless restrained, the market would crash, devastating those who look upon their home as their pension, he said.  

The Times says birdwatchers proclaimed Spring's start after the chiffchaffs were sighted - apparently now a better indicator than the first cuckoo.


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