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Sunday, 30 January, 2000, 23:07 GMT
Lego tops toys league

legoland Lego theme parks attract thousands of visitors


Children's favourite, Lego, has been named the Toy of the Century.

The classic building bricks topped the list of toys in a poll of UK toy sellers.


Building success
'Lego' means "play well" in Danish
Lego blocks initially known as Automatic Binding Bricks
Legoland theme parks in Denmark, US and UK
203 billion Lego bricks manufactured from 1949 to 1998
Experts calculate there are more than 102 billion ways to combine six eight-stud bricks.

Lego - a traditional toy of budding young architects and builders - beat the teddy bear, Action Man and Barbie to the coveted title.

Monopoly - the pastime for aspiring capitalists - was named Game of Century.

And the yo-yo rose to victory in the Craze of the Century category.

The votes came from members of the British Association of Toy Retailers (BATR) after considering polls conducted on the internet and in newspapers.

The awards were presented at a dinner in London, attended by 600 guests from all areas of the toy industry.


lego man Lego: Not just for children

Lego was first introduced in Denmark in 1932 by Ole Kirk Christiansen.

The coloured bricks first went on sale in the UK in 1955. New types of blocks, vehicles, aircraft and people were introduced over the years. Today, hi-tech bricks are embedded with microchips to create robots, controlled over the internet.

Gerry Masters, spokesman for BATR, said: "The brick has been developed for each generation and the toy has never stood still, but fundamentally the classic building brick still remains."

And he said Monopoly was as popular today as ever before.

"It is the classic family game and is still one of the top selling board games around," Mr Masters said.

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See also:
27 Jan 98 |  Sci/Tech
Lego adds chips to old blocks
22 Jan 99 |  The Company File
Lego to cut 1,000 jobs
19 Jan 99 |  The Company File
Red brick for Lego
23 May 98 |  Business
Lego recalls rattles

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