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Saturday, 27 November, 1999, 13:27 GMT
Yogic flyers come down to earth
Yogic flying: Bouncing for peace

Supporters of the UK Natural Law party will be keeping their feet on the ground at the annual conference.

The New Age party's conference will tackle world peace, poverty, pollution and drugs abuse - but "yogic flying" is off the agenda this year.

The party came to public attention through the practice of yogic flying - where people bounce across mats with their legs raised and crossed.

It even forms the central plank of the international party's defence policy - based on an "invincible army of positivity" made up of 7,000 yogic flyers "radiating peace and harmony to the world".

Challenge to government

But this year's conference agenda is based around more practical topics.

The party said it would focus on "topics of global significance" such as genetically modified food, the arms trade and human rights.

Party leader and London mayoral candidate Geoffrey Clements said: "Now it is time for us to challenge the government and alert people to the dangers of continuing with the old and failed policies."

He said despite the founding of the Natural Law Party in 1992, government policy was still "running along the old road of problems and mistakes".

The conference will be held on Saturday and Sunday at the Maharishi Golden Dome, in Skelmersdale, Lancashire.

The conference will conclude with a concert of sitar music.

The party said: "This beautiful classical music creates peace and harmony throughout nature."

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