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Last Updated: Tuesday, 13 June 2006, 16:01 GMT 17:01 UK
In quotes: Terror raid brothers
Two brothers from east London who were at the centre of a police anti-terror raid involving some 250 officers have spoken of their ordeal.

Abdul Kahar, 23, was shot in the chest. His 20-year-old brother, Abul Koyair, was arrested. Both were held under anti-terrorism laws for more than a week before being released without charge.

This transcript contains strong language.

ABDUL KAHAR ON BEING SHOT

Abdul Kahar

I assumed a robbery was happening, so I went down, I was coming towards the passageway and I think at that time my brother was right behind me, he was still screaming.

As I took the first step down the stairs, I turned around to look at what was down the stairs.

As soon as I turn around I just see an orange spark and a big bang.

At that time I flew into the wall. As I flew into the wall, I slipped down. As I slipped down, I was on the floor. I look to my right, on my chest I see blood coming down my chest and I see a hole in my chest.

At that moment, I knew I was shot, but the first thing I was thinking is that there's an armed robbery taking place.

ABUL KOYAIR ON THE RAID

Abul Koyair
All of a sudden, my brother went down the second sets of stairs and I heard a loud bang, and it was a big flash and then after that everything was so quiet.

No-one said nothing. I thought it was like a dream at first. No-one was speaking, saying anything.

After about one, two minutes, I realised that this is not a dream. I realised that my own brother got shot for no reason.

ABDUL KAHAR ON THE POLICE

I was begging: 'Please, please, I cannot move.'

He just kicked me in my face, and he kept on saying: 'Shut the fuck up. Stay here.'

I thought they were going to shoot me again or shoot my brother.

I heard them shouting: 'Secure the room.'

At that moment, I still did not know they were the police, they never said a word about the police.

I just thought: 'They're going to kill us.'

ABUL KOYAIR ON THE POLICE

Actually me myself, I applied to be a police officer, a community police officer, recently.

They gave me a confirmation letter, which I received from them.

My family was behind me in what I wanted to do, and now I think all their views has changed.

They don't want me to be associated anywhere near police. I feel that my mum, my dad they don't trust polices anymore.

ABDUL KAHAR ON THE AFTERMATH

It's ruined my life. From the day, from the time they entered my house, it's turned my life upside down.

I can't go sleep. Every day I have flashback. For 19 days I ain't been sleeping.

I been on medication trying to get sleep. I can't go to sleep. I keep on having flashbacks. I can't go sleep with the light off. I feel fear when the room is dark.

ABDUL KAHAR ON BEING INTERROGATED

At the beginning, I was more curious. I wanted to know the reason why I got arrested.

I knew it was something to do with terrorism. I asked the officer in charge of the police: 'Can you tell me, what have I done?'

They mentioned a few names of terrorist organisations. I didn't recognise any of them until they mentioned al-Qaeda.

Then they said: 'Are you a member of Jemaah Islamiah?' They kept on telling me I'm a member of a few things.

Then at the end they go: 'I know it's going to be a daft question, but are you a member of a white organisation, the Ku Klux Klan?'

I didn't even have time to laugh. I thought: 'These people are thinking I'm a white terrorist now', and they wasn't even joking.

ABDUL KAHAR ON POLICE CUSTODY

All the way through my detention, I kept thinking they are going to frame me, they are going to frame me.

I'm a law-abiding citizen. I was born and bred in east London. I love my town.

I ain't done nothing to this country. This is my country. I love everyone around.

ABDUL KAHAR ON ISLAM

My understanding of jihad is to strive and help people.

I don't see jihad as the way these cults think. I don't class them as Muslims, I don't class them as representing Islam.

The way my father has taught me, the word jihad is the way we strive to help people. I do believe jihad is good.

Violence is not in my nature. It's not in my religion. Islam is alienating that. Islam has nothing to do with that. Islam is peace.




BBC NEWS: VIDEO AND AUDIO
Mohammed Abdul Kahar and Abul Koyair describe the raid



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