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Last Updated: Sunday, 11 June 2006, 16:29 GMT 17:29 UK
Muslims protest over terror raid
Muslims are protesting outside Scotland Yard
Muslims are protesting outside Scotland Yard
Muslims have protested outside Scotland Yard against the tactics used by police in an anti-terror raid in east London.

Brothers Abul Koyair, 20, and Mohammed Abdulkahar, 23, who was shot in the shoulder, were released without charge a week after the raid in Forest Gate.

In a statement read to the protesters, their sister said their family had been through hell during the past week.

The police have defended the raid and the Independent Police Complaints Commission is investigating the case.

About 300 people gathered for the protest - against "heavy-handed police tactics" - outside the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police in central London.

The Muslim Association of Britain and the Islamic Human Rights Commission were among Muslim groups represented.

The brothers, who had been held under the Terrorism Act 2000, were released on Friday after police found no trace of an alleged chemical device at their home.

The pair had denied allegations of involvement in terrorism.

They were arrested on 2 June after a raid by some 250 officers - some armed and some wearing chemical suits - on a terraced house in Lansdown Road.

They are still recovering from their injuries - both physically as well as mentally
Humeya Kalam

Their sister Humeya Kalam issued a statement on their behalf which was read aloud to demonstrators.

In it she said: "My brothers would like to have come today, to show unity.

"However they are unable to do so because they are still recovering from their injuries - both physically as well as mentally."

The family was "very relieved to have them back after the hell we went through last week", Ms Kalam added.

And she thanked "all those who supported us through this dramatic ordeal".

Ms Kalam also told demonstrators she hoped their protest would "highlight the fact no other innocent family should be forced to go through the same nightmare".

There is a huge amount of fear and anxiety now in the community
Islamic Human Rights Commission chairman Massoud Shajareh

Islamic Human Rights Commission chairman Massoud Shajareh told BBC News: "Either they were shot because they were Muslim or perceived to be Muslim.

"The papers were talking about [how] they became very Islamic in the last few years, as if that is automatically connected to terrorist activity.

"There is a huge amount of fear and anxiety now in the community.

"People are feeling they are going to be next."

We can only defeat terrorism if all communities are working together
Home Office Minister Tony McNulty

But Home Office Minister Tony McNulty warned against jumping to "what can only be speculative conclusions at this stage".

"We do need to fully understand exactly what went on, why it went on, what the problem with the intelligence was," he told BBC News.

"We can only defeat terrorism if all communities are working together.

"And the police work in hazardous and very often unsafe conditions in the interests of all those communities."

Compensation claims

Meanwhile solicitor Gareth Peirce, who is acting for the family, said the brothers are considering legal action for damages against the Met.

"Of course it is more than likely that they will claim for compensation, that is a natural consequence," she said.

"It is how society orders itself when one person has done wrong."

According to reports in the Sunday Times and the Sunday Telegraph the brothers could claim up to 500,000 in compensation for Mr Abdulkahar's injuries and for libel damages.

Mark Stephens, a human rights and media lawyer at Finers, Stephens and Innocent, said Mr Kahar could receive 30,000 compensation for being shot.

The brothers could also claim well over 100,000 each for libel damages and compensation to pay for repairs to their home, he added.




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