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Last Updated: Monday, 13 February 2006, 01:48 GMT
July bomb memorial plan welcomed
A visitor reads the 7/7 memorial plaque
A memorial plaque was unveiled a month after the bombings
Plans for a national monument to honour the victims and survivors of the 7 July London bombings have been welcomed by support groups.

Chancellor Gordon Brown is to unveil details of government funding for a permanent memorial to the 52 people who died on the transport network.

Cruse Bereavement said a memorial might provide "comfort" to victims' families.

A small remembrance plaque was unveiled in London's Victoria Embankment Gardens in August.

Cruse was among the organisations which formed support group 7th July Assistance in the aftermath of the attacks.

'Fitting'

Mr Brown is to announce the government funding in a speech on the continued terrorist threat to the UK.

People, particularly when they have been bereaved by a national disaster, sometimes need to have this kind of public recognition
Annie Kiff-Wood
Cruse Bereavement

He will tell the Royal United Institute in Whitehall that money is available for a memorial that "families may consider fitting".

A national memorial service was held at St Paul's Cathedral in November last year.

"People, particularly when they have been bereaved by a national disaster, sometimes need to have this kind of public recognition," said Annie Kiff-Wood, of Cruse Bereavement.

"It can be important and a comfort. Families appreciated the public memorial service."


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