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Last Updated: Tuesday, 1 November 2005, 15:40 GMT
In quotes: London memorial service
Relatives, survivors, and others give their thoughts and reflections on the day thousands gather for a memorial service at St Paul's Cathedral for those affected by the London bombings on 7 July.

ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY, DR ROWAN WILLIAMS

The terrorist is the enemy not just of a system or a government but of the whole idea that we are each of us unique and responsible and non-replaceable.

If it were true that one victim would be as good as any other, which is what the terrorist believes, the human world would be a completely different place, unrecognisable to most of us.

We are here grieving, after all, because those who so pointlessly and terribly died were, each one of them, precious, non-replaceable.

And those who suffered injury and deep trauma and loss are likewise unique, their minds and hearts scarred by this suffering.

To those who proclaim by their actions that it doesn't matter who suffers, who dies, we say in our mourning, 'No, there are no generalities for us, no anonymous and interchangeable people. We live by loving what's special, unique in each person. Everyone matters'."

LOYITA WORLEY, ALDGATE TUBE STATION BLAST SURVIVOR

There hasn't been anything formal to unite those who were killed and I think it's a nice way for everybody involved to get together.

A lot of people were involved from all over the world and all over England and have been dealing with things in isolation.

This is an opportunity for people to be under one roof to remember those who died and those who were badly injured and whose lives will never be the same.

VERONICA RUSSELL, WHOSE SON PHILIP DIED AT TAVISTOCK SQUARE

It will be good to remember the people who died in the bomb blasts and to be with the other families, who've also suffered as we have.

We have met some of the families already, and it will be good to see them again, and to have this special, this very special service.

MAJOR ANN REED, SALVATION ARMY

Immediately after 7 July, there was an extraordinary kind of coming together. It was a privilege to take part at Trafalgar Square in the vigil that was organised by the mayor of London, and to take part with people from other faiths and other age groups.

It was an occasion where there were no barriers and people really came together in a way that was quite wonderful, really, and I would love to think something of that spirit continues.

CATHY JOHNSON, WHOSE HUSBAND ADRIAN DIED AT RUSSELL SQUARE

I try and think just one day at a time, I try and live one day at the time. The children keep me going. The trust (The Adrian Johnson Memorial Trust, set up by Mrs Johnson for children affected by terrorism) is helping, it's keeping me very busy, and it is a positive thing to do, and I do feel it's very, very important to stay positive, for my health, the children's health, and for our well being...

It's the first trip down to London for me, which is difficult anyway. There's quite a few positive things about it, though.

We are meeting some of the families we've been chatting to over the internet. It's going to be quite difficult but it's important for the families to get together.

MARIE FATAYI-WILLIAMS, WHOSE SON ANTHONY DIED AT TAVISTOCK SQUARE

I think a lack of peace in the world is a current problem of this millennium and a more concerted effort should be made.

I am trying to reach out to mothers and women, saying let's come together. Let's find out the root cause of all this and reach out.

DANIA GORODI, WHOSE SISTER MICHELLE DIED AT RUSSELL SQUARE

I hope we can have some comforting thoughts coming out in the cathedral, something that will make us think that our loved ones, as well as the survivors, were very special people and they have died innocently in a terrible tragedy.

I will be thinking about (Michelle) as a wonderful, generous person who has died on an ordinary day going to work, and I will be thinking that every one of us could have been her, on that day...

It is meaningful in a way that the whole country today will be thinking of those victims, and will be acknowledging the tragedy of the survivors and the families that have been left behind to suffer.

GARY STEVENS, DUTY MANAGER AT RUSSELL SQUARE TUBE STATION

I was meant to start work at 0900 that morning. I woke up early, I couldn't sleep, so I decided to start work early. If I'd have gone in at the normal time I'd have been on the affected train, train 3/11, and I would have been in the first car. I use that carriage every day to exit the station...

I was in my office at work, and at 0854 all the lights flickered in the office... we went down to the platform, couldn't see anything at all, when we noticed there was a light in the tunnel.

We hung on to see what it was and it was the driver of train 3/11 with about 30 or 40 injured customers, who had managed to get out and he led them down the tunnel. Some of them had quite serious head injuries, clothes blown off, things like that...

It will be a very emotional day, but I think that it's a good thing that everybody's attending, to pay our respects to the unfortunate who were lost in that day, also the ones that were injured, and basically to draw a line under it and try and move on.

THE VERY REVEREND JOHN MOSES, DEAN OF ST PAUL'S

I think there'll be a lot of raw emotion. There'll be a lot of pain. A lot of anger. A lot of hurt, and these things will not go away.

I'm a London boy and Londoners are quite stubborn. We will not be beaten and we have to live with this awful thing and we have to do it in a fairly hard-headed way.

But let's be quite clear that for the families of the victims, and some of those who were injured, and some of those who were caught up in the work of rescue and rehabilitation, this is going to be a very painful afternoon.

SIR IAN BLAIR, METROPOLITAN POLICE COMMISSIONER

Today is a time for reflection.

I think about the words spoken by the Chief Rabbi on 8 July - there are hundreds of languages spoken in London, but there is one universal language which is the language of tears.

Tomorrow is the time for a discussion about terror legislation.

Suicide bombers are entirely indiscriminate - Muslims, Hindus, Jews, black and white, male and female - they all died.

There is nothing here about any one community being responsible. Our job is to support those communities and to help us protect ourselves against terrorism.



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