[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Monday, 14 February, 2005, 00:35 GMT
British women are 'happy singles'
Man and woman
Many of those surveyed had no desire to find a partner
More than half of single British women are happy to stay unattached, according to a survey.

The poll, for market research group Mintel, found 56% of single women were "very happy" with their lives as they were and had no desire to be married.

It found 46% of single men felt the same, but one in four said they missed the "comfort and closeness of a hug".

Mintel interviewed 1,039 people between the ages of 25 and 70 who were neither married nor living with someone.

The poll included those who were divorced or widowed.

It found one in four men aged 25 to 40 still lived with their parents, as opposed to 13% of women.

Almost half of single men questioned said the biggest downside of living alone was "not having enough sex".

For women, the biggest gripe was that people always assumed they wanted to be in a relationship.

The survey, timed to coincide with Valentine's day, suggested many singles would have little interest in the sentiment of the day.

Apathetic?

Some 39% of men and 35% of women said they considered themselves "apathetic about love".

Jenny Catlin, consumer analyst at Mintel, said: "Men are clearly going to have to work harder if they are looking for a partner in future.

"With half of women being very wary or having no wish to find a partner and one in 10 men saying that they are too busy to find a partner, there is clearly scope for the dating industry."




SEE ALSO:
Single women outnumbered by men
27 Feb 04 |  Politics


RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East | South Asia
UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature | Technology | Health
Have Your Say | In Pictures | Week at a Glance | Country Profiles | In Depth | Programmes
Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific