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Last Updated: Tuesday, 21 December, 2004, 10:01 GMT
Diana fountain is 'cultural icon'
Tourists tread on the edge of the fountain
Structural problems have hampered the fountain since it opened
The Diana, Princess of Wales memorial fountain could become a cultural icon to rival the Tower of London, according to a survey.

The Heritage Lottery Fund asked 1,000 people to name iconic British symbols of the future.

The 3.6m fountain in London's Hyde Park came second with 21% - the London Eye wheel topped the poll with 34%.

Other surprise nominations were the Big Brother house, Blackpool pleasure beach and the Coronation Street set.

And 6% of people suggested the Bullring shopping centre in Birmingham.

Some people even nominated Robbie William's birthplace in Stoke-on-Trent.

FUTURE SYMBOLS
London Eye 34%
Diana Fountain 21%
Blackpool Pleasure Beach 17%
Coronation Street set 7%
Bullring 6%
Robbie Williams' birthplace 2%
Big Brother House 1%
No answer 12%

The Diana fountain has been plagued by problems since it opened in the summer.

It was temporarily shut down when three people were hurt after slipping on the sculpture.

And it will undergo restoration work next year.

Yet the survey suggests many people believe the fountain will be an important symbol in the future.

Carole Souter, director of the Heritage Lottery Fund, said the fountain could become as loved as the Tower of London or Hadrian's Wall.

She said: "Over time we have come to love lots of places which were not loved in their heyday - our mines, mills and even prisons.

"The Diana Fountain looks set to rank among them one day."




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