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Last Updated: Wednesday, 11 August, 2004, 17:51 GMT 18:51 UK
Rapist's 7m 'should aid victims'
Iorworth Hoare
Iorworth Hoare: Prisoners can keep lottery winnings
A rapist who won 7m on the National Lottery should use the money to help rape victims, support groups say.

Iorworth Hoare, 52, is near the end of a life sentence for attempted rape and was on release from open prison when he bought his winning ticket.

Yvonne Traynor, of the Rape and Sexual Abuse Support Centre, said Hoare should also fund a rehabilitation programme for rapists.

Hoare received a seven-year sentence for rape in 1983.

Legal experts say Hoare could be forced to pay compensation to his victims.

Hoare was one of three winners to share Saturday's 21m Lotto Extra jackpot.

He should give every single penny of that money to rape crisis organisations
Julie Bindel
Campaigner on violence against women

Under Home Office guidelines, prisoners on temporary release from jail are allowed to play the lottery and can claim a winning prize.

But the Home Office said the prisoner's access to the money would be restricted while he was in custody.

He is serving life after being convicted of attempted rape in 1989. He was also jailed several times for a string of sex attacks during the 1970s and 1980s.

Contrition

Ms Traynor told BBC News 24: "What is he going to do with the money? If he is really contrite, then is he going to be paying his victims, is he going to give his victims some compensation?

"Is he going to be going on a rehabilitation programme for himself? Is he going to fund a rehabilitation programme for other rapists?

"If he feels totally sorry for what he has done, perhaps that is what he ought to be doing with the money."

Julie Bindel, a feminist writer and campaigner on violence against women, said: "He should give every single penny of that money to rape crisis organisations.

"He has made a dreadful impact on somebody's life and he should show he has seen the errors of his ways," she said.

Legal action

Specialist personal injury and compensation lawyer Neil Sugarman said Hoare's victims could sue for a share of his new-found wealth.

HAVE YOUR SAY
As long as criminals stand the same chance of winning as others I don't see why they shouldn't play
Frank, UK

"The biggest difficulty any claimant will face is the limitation periods, and generally speaking... you are looking at three years.

"But someone assaulted before that period may be able to say they didn't take any action at the time because the offender had no money.

"As a matter of public policy, in a court which has discretion to override the limitation periods, you may find a judge prepared to say: 'You are years too late, but we are going to allow the claim'."

A Home Office spokesman said he could not comment on individual cases but that there was nothing to stop victims suing offenders for damages through the civil courts.

Hoare's brother Rhys Owen, a hospital night porter, said he hoped the money would keep his brother away from crime.

"I'm not going begging for any money. Hopefully he will sort himself out with his money and it will keep him on the straight and narrow," he said.

Meanwhile, Conservative leader Michael Howard said there seemed to be "something very odd in the arrangements" that allowed prisoners to play the lottery.

"Prisoners are not allowed to do the football pools, they are not allowed to buy premium bonds but they are allowed to buy lottery tickets. That doesn't seem to make sense," Mr Howard said.


WATCH AND LISTEN
The BBC's Luisa Baldini
"Hoare was on weekend leave... when his numbers came up"



SEE ALSO:
Lottery winner is sent to prison
06 Jul 04  |  Norfolk
Curfew off 10m lotto winner
07 Nov 02  |  England


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