Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education



Front Page

World

UK

UK Politics

Business

Sci/Tech

Health

Education

Sport

Entertainment

Talking Point

In Depth

On Air

Archive
Feedback
Low Graphics
Help

Friday, April 30, 1999 Published at 20:42 GMT 21:42 UK


UK

Child prodigy teaches the Koran

Mohammed Hussain aims to be a religious leader

He comes from Iran, he is just seven-years-old, and for the past week thousands have been flocking to a hall in London to hear him speak.

Mohammed Hussain Tabatabai is being hailed as a miracle of the Muslim world. He has memorised the entire Koran - the Islamic holy book - but more remarkably he can also interpret and explain it to his elders.

In the past week 13,000 Muslims have flocked to see him at the Islamic Centre in north-west London, where he has been described as a divinely inspired child prodigy.


[ image: Mohammed Hussain holds a doctorate at the age of seven]
Mohammed Hussain holds a doctorate at the age of seven
His father has carefully educated him. He knows all 6,000 verses of the Koran off by heart.

On Thursday night he confidently gave a lecture on the teachings of an Islamic teacher who died 400 years ago.

It is not that unusual for talented Muslim children to learn to recite the Koran by heart, but Mohammed Hussain is said to be the best exponent of the Koran for his age anywhere. Few, if any, other children have his ability to understand and interpret the text.

At the Islamic Centre, theological questions were asked to test Mohammed Hussain. BBC Religious Affairs Correspondent Emily Buchanan chose a random passage to see if he could quote chapter and verse.

He got the answer right, using his photographic memory.

Mohammed Hussain was asked what was so important about knowing the Koran by heart?

He replied that, if he does not feel like praying, the Koran encourages him to pray, and if he wants to bad-mouth someone, the Koran tells him not to.

And asked if he was ever naughty or misbehaved he said: "Yes, sometimes."

Mohammed Hussain aims to be a religious leader, and as he already holds a doctorate he is well on his way.



Advanced options | Search tips




Back to top | BBC News Home | BBC Homepage | ©


UK Contents

Northern Ireland
Scotland
Wales
England

Relevant Stories

24 Feb 99 | Crossing continents
25 February 1999: Changing faces in Iran

11 Feb 99 | World
Iran 20 years on

17 Jan 99 | Join The Debate
What you are saying so far





Internet Links


The Koran

Iran Online

The Digital Islamic Library Project


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.




In this section

Next steps for peace

Blairs' surprise over baby

Bowled over by Lord's

Beef row 'compromise' under fire

Hamilton 'would sell mother'

Industry misses new trains target

From Sport
Quins fightback shocks Cardiff

From Business
Vodafone takeover battle heats up

IRA ceasefire challenge rejected

Thousands celebrate Asian culture

From Sport
Christie could get two-year ban

From Entertainment
Colleagues remember Compo

Mother pleads for baby's return

Toys withdrawn in E.coli health scare

From Health
Nurses role set to expand

Israeli PM's plane in accident

More lottery cash for grassroots

Pro-lifers plan shock launch

Double killer gets life

From Health
Cold 'cure' comes one step closer

From UK Politics
Straw on trial over jury reform

Tatchell calls for rights probe into Mugabe

Ex-spy stays out in the cold

From UK Politics
Blair warns Livingstone

From Health
Smear equipment `misses cancers'

From Entertainment
Boyzone star gets in Christmas spirit

Fake bubbly warning

Murder jury hears dead girl's diary

From UK Politics
Germ warfare fiasco revealed

Blair babe triggers tabloid frenzy

Tourists shot by mistake

A new look for News Online